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Java Web Services Tutorial | @CloudExpo #DevOps #API #Java #Microservices

Web services have taken the development world by storm

Java Web Services Tutorial: Improve App Communication and Flexibility
By Eugen Paraschiv

Web services have taken the development world by storm, especially in recent years as they've become more and more widely adopted. There are naturally many reasons for this, but first, let's understand what exactly a web service is.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) defines "web of services" as "message-based design frequently found on the Web and in enterprise software". Basically, a web service is a method of sending a message between two devices through a network.

In practical terms, this translates to an application which outputs communication in a standardized format for other client applications to receive and act on.

Web services have been adopted so quickly because they bring several important advantages:

  • Allow communication and interoperability between applications running on different platforms and built with different technologies
  • Enable different applications to share common standard formats and representations
  • Can be reused by many different types of applications
  • Are loosely coupled with other services
  • Allow flexibility in choosing the functionalities you need

Historically, there are two primary types of web services: SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) and REST (REpresentational State Transfer) services; the latter is more recent and more widely used today.

This article will detail both, but put a stronger focus on REST.

Differences between SOAP and REST web services
SOAP is a protocol for communication between applications and is an early standard for creating web services, developed by Microsoft in 1998. It relies heavily on XML and can only exchange XML messages and requires a complex parsing and processing stack.

One of the advantages of SOAP is that it supports multiple protocols, has built-in security and error handling, and is somewhat strictly regulated, which can lead to a higher level of standardization.

However, SOAP is also fairly difficult to use and requires significant resources, which excludes it as an option on some embedded or mobile devices.

By contrast, REST is lighter, faster, more flexible and, as such, easier to use. It can also output data in several formats including XML and JSON.

Here's a simple, high-level summary of the main differences between the two standards:

SOAP vs REST

You can read more about the differences between the two architectural approaches here.

SOAP Web Services
As we discussed earlier, SOAP is an XML-based protocol for application communication. Although it's definitely slower and more resource heavy than its REST counterpart, it is similarly platform and language independent.

In the Java ecosystem, Java EE provides the JAX-WS API to help you create SOAP-based web services.

With JAX-WS, you can define a SOAP service in both an RPC or Document style. Both styles consist of a set of annotations to be applied to your classes, based on which the XML files are generated.

Let's see an example of an RPC style web service. First, you need to create an interface or class with the proper annotations, which will declare the methods to be accessed by other applications:

@WebService
@SOAPBinding(style = SOAPBinding.Style.RPC)
public interface UserService {
@WebMethod
public void addUser(User user);

@WebMethod
public Users getUsers();
}

We used two primary annotations here - @WebService to declare the service interface, and @WebMethod for each method to be exposed.

The @SoapBinding annotation specifies the style of web service. A Document-style service is declared in a similar manner, replacing the @SoapBinding annotation with:

@SOAPBinding(style = SOAPBinding.Style.Document)

The difference between the two styles is in the way the XML files are generated.

Finally, you need to add an implementation class for the service interface:

@WebService(endpointInterface = "com.stackify.services .UserService")
public class DefaultUserImpl implements UserService {
ArrayList<User> usersList = new ArrayList<>();

@Override
public void addUser(User user) {
usersList.add(user);
}

@Override
public Users getUsers() {
Users users = new Users();
users.setUsers(usersList);
return users;
}
}C/code>

The implementing methods must be public, and must not be static or final. You can also make use of methods annotated with @PostConstruct and @PreDestroy for lifecycle event callbacks.

Note that creating the interface is optional for a JAX-WS web service implementation. You can add the annotations directly to the class, and JAX-WS will implicitly define a service endpoint interface.

Finally, to publish the web service, use the Endpoint class:

public class ServicePublisher {
public static void main(String[] args) {
Endpoint.publish("http://localhost :8080/users",new DefaultUserService());
}
}

If you run this application, you can see the XML describing your endpoint, written in WSDL (Web Service Description Language) format, by accessing the URL:

http://localhost:8080/users?wsdl

SOAP Web Service Client
To make use of the SOAP service, let's implement a simple client application.

One way to do this is by creating a Java project and importing the web service definitions from the web service WSDL document. After creating the project, open a command line and move to the source folder of the new project; then execute the command:

wsimport -s . http://localhost:8080/users?wsdl

This will have the effect of generating the following classes in your source folder:

Source Folder Classes

Now, you can easily make use of the generated classes:

public class JAXWSClient
public static void main(String[] args) {
DefaultUserImplService service = new DefaultUserImplService();
User user = new User();
user.setEmail("[email protected]");
user.setName("John");

UserService port = service. getDefaultUserImplPort();
port.addUser(user);
Users users = port.getUsers();
System.out.println(users.getUsers() .iterator().next().getName());
}
}

REST Web Services
REST or REpresentational State Transfer, is an architectural style for building applications that can communicate over a network. The principles of REST were first laid out by Roy Fielding in his 2000 doctoral dissertation.

In a few short years, REST has overtaken SOAP in popularity due to its ease of use, speed, flexibility, and similarity to core architecture choices that power the web itself.

Here's an interesting graph that shows the popularity of both approaches in the Java ecosystem:

REST vs SOAP Popularity

Let's have a quick look at the core principles of a REST API:

  • it follows a client-server architecture
  • it's based on Resources accessible through their URIs
  • it uses unique Resource URIs
  • it's stateless and cacheable
  • Clients can manipulate Resources through their URIs
  • the web service can be layered
  • can run over a wide range of protocols (though most implementations run over HTTP/HTTPS)

REST With JAX-RS
For a clearer understanding of these principles, let's take a look at an implementation example. We're going to use the JAX-RS API to create a simple REST API as a good starting point for our discussion.

JAX-RS Annotations and Setup
Like JAX-WS, JAX-RS API relies heavily on annotations. Since this is only a specification - meaning a set of interfaces and annotations - you also need to choose an implementation of the spec.

In the example, we're going to use the reference implementation of JAX-RS, which is Jersey; another very popular implementation you can try is RESTEasy.

Let's start by first understanding the most important annotations in JAX-RS:

  • @Path - defines the path used to access the web service
  • @PathParam - injects values from the URL into a method parameter
  • @FormParam - injects values from an HTML form into a method parameter
  • @Produces - specifies the type of the response
  • @Consumes - specifies the type of the request data

The API also contains annotations corresponding to each HTTP verb: @GET, @POST, @PUT, @DELETE, @HEAD, @OPTIONS.

To start working with the Jersey JAX-RS implementation, you need to add the jersey-server dependency to your project classpath. If you're using Maven, this is easily done and will also bring in the required jsr311-api dependency:

<dependency>
<groupId>org.glassfish.jersey.containers </groupId>
<artifactId>jersey-container-servlet </artifactId>
<version>2.25.1</version>
</dependency>

In addition to this, you can also add the jersey-media-moxy library to enable the API to enable JSON representations:

<dependency>
<groupId>org.glassfish.jersey.media</groupId>
<artifactId>jersey-media-moxy</artifactId>
<version>2.25.1</version>
</dependency>

Having the option to use JSON as the primary representation media type can be quite powerful, not only for flexibility but also in terms of performance.

The JAX-RS Web Service
Now you can start writing the simple web service:

@Path("/users")
public class UserService {
private static List<User> users = new ArrayList<>();

@POST
@Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
public Response addUser(User user) {
users.add(user);
return Response.ok().build();
}

@GET
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
public List<User> getUsers() {
return users;
}
}

Notice how we're creating two endpoints here - a /users POST endpoint for adding a User resources, and a /users GET endpoint for retrieving the list of users.

Next, you need to define the configuration - extending ResourceConfig and specifying the packages to be scanned for JAX-RS services:

public class ApplicationInitializer extends ResourceConfig {
public ApplicationInitializer() {
packages("com.stackify.services");
}
}

Finally, you need to add a web.xml file which registers the ServletContainer servlet and the ApplicationInitializer class:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <web-app xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xmlns="http://xmlns.jcp.org/xml/ns/javaee"
xsi:schemaLocation="http://xmlns.jcp.org/xml/ns/javaee
http://xmlns.jcp.org/xml/ns/javaee/web-app_3_1.xsd" id="WebApp_ID" version="3.1">

<display-name>rest-server</display-name>
<servlet>
<servlet-name>rest-server</servlet-name>
<servlet-class>org.glassfish.jersey.servlet. ServletContainer</servlet-class> <init-param>
<param-name>javax.ws.rs.Application</param-name>
<param-value>com.stackify. ApplicationInitializer</param-value>
</init-param>
<load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
<servlet-name>rest-server</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>
</web-app>

After running the application, you can access the endpoints at http://localhost:8080/rest-server/users.

Using curl, you can add a new user:

curl -i -X POST -H "Content-Type:application/json" -d "{"email":"[email protected]","name":"John"}" http://localhost:8080/rest-server/users

Then retrieve the collection resource using a simple GET:

curl -i -X GET http://localhost:8080/rest-server/users/

Testing the REST Web Service
As you're building a web service, you naturally need to test the functionality you're implementing. And, because is is an HTTP-based API, you can interact with it relatively simply, using a standard HTTP client.

That's exactly what we're going to do here - use a powerful client specifically focused on testing REST services - REST Assured:

<dependency>
<groupId>io.rest-assured</groupId>
<artifactId>rest-assured</artifactId>
<version>3.0.3</version>
</dependency>

REST Assured follows a typical BDD format, with each statement structured like this:

  • given - the section used to declare things like parameters or content type (optional)
  • when - the part where the HTTP method and URL to call are defined
  • then - the section where the response is verified

Let's take a look at a simple JUnit test for the REST service we developed previously:

@Test
public void whenAddUser_thenGetUserOk() {
RestAssured.baseURI = "http://localhost:8080/rest-server";

String json = "{\"email\":\"[email protected]\", \"name\":\"John\"}";
given()
.contentType("application/json")
.body(json)
.when()
.post("/users")
.then()
.statusCode(200);

when()
.get("/users")
.then()
.contentType("application/json")
.body("name", hasItem("John"))
.body("email", hasItem("[email protected]"));
}

In this quick test, we send a POST to the /users endpoint to create a new User. Then, we do a GET, retrieve all users and verify the response to check if it contains the new user we just created.

Of course, to run the test, you first need to make sure the API is running on localhost first.

Building a Client for the REST Service
Your web services will usually be consumed by a different client application that interacts with the API over HTTP.

Let's use Angular 4 to create a simple front-end client, with an HTML form to add a user and a table to display all users in the system.

Angular 4 is quite well-suited as a front-end framework for working with REST services - as it has first-class REST support with the Http module.

To start using the library, you first need to install node.js and npm, then download the Angular command line interface:

npm install -g @angular/cli

To setup a new Angular project, navigate to your project location and run:

ng new rest-client

The process of setting up the project can take a few minutes. At the end, a number of new files will be created.

In the src/app folder, let's create an app.service.ts file where a User class will be defined, as well as UserService which calls the two web services endpoints:

export class User {
constructor(
public email: string,
public name: string) { }
}

@Injectable()
export class UserService {
constructor(
private _http: Http){}

url = 'http://localhost:8080/rest-server/users';

addUser(user){
let headers = new Headers({'Content-Type': 'application/json'});
let options = new RequestOptions({ headers: headers});

return this._http.post(this.url, JSON.stringify(user), options)
.map(
(_response: Response) => {
return _response;
},
err => alert('Error adding user'));
}

getUsers() {
return this._http.get(this.url)
.map((_response: Response) => {
return _response.json();
});
}
}

Next, let's create an Angular Component that will make use of the UserService and create objects to bind to HTML elements:

@Component({
selector: 'users-page',
providers: [UserService],
templateUrl: './users.component.html',
styleUrls: ['./app.component.css']
})
export class UsersComponent {
title = 'Users';

constructor(
private _service:UserService){}

public user = {email: "", name: ""};
public res=[];

addUser() {
this._service.addUser(this.user)
.subscribe( () => this.getUsers());
}

getUsers() {
this._service.getUsers()
.subscribe(
users => { this.res=[];
users.forEach(usr => {
this.res.push(
new User(usr.email, usr.name))
});
});
}
}

The visual interface of the Angular application contains an HTML form and table, with data bindings:

<form>
Email: <input type="text" [(ngModel)]="user.email" name="email"/><br />
Name: <input type="text" [(ngModel)]="user.name" name="name"/><br />
<input type="submit" (click)="addUser()" value="Add User"/>
</form>

<table>
<tr *ngFor="let user of res" >
<td>{{user.email}} </td>
<td>{{user.name}} </td> </tr>
</table>

Let's define the main AppComponent that will include the UsersComponent:

@Component({
selector: 'app-root',
templateUrl: './app.component.html',
styleUrls: ['./app.component.css']
})
export class AppComponent {
title = 'app';
}

This is all wrapped up in the main application module:

@NgModule({
declarations: [
AppComponent,
UsersComponent
],
imports: [
BrowserModule,
HttpModule,
FormsModule,
RouterModule.forRoot([
{ path: '', component: AppComponent },
{ path: 'users', component: UsersComponent }])],
providers: [],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }>

Finally, the UsersComponent is included in the main HTML page:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>REST Client</title>
<base href="/">
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
</head>

<body>
<users-page>loading users component</users-page>
</body>
</html>

To run the Angular application, go to the project directory in a command line, and simply run the command:

ng serve

The application can be accessed at the URL: http://localhost:4200/

Since the REST client and server run on different origins, by default the Angular client cannot access the REST endpoints, due to the CORS constraint in the browser. In order to allow cross-origin requests, let's add a filter to the REST web service application that adds an Access-Control-Allow-Origin header to every response:

@Provider
public class CorsFilter implements ContainerResponseFilter {

@Override
public void filter(ContainerRequestContext requestContext,
ContainerResponseContext response) throws IOException {
response.getHeaders().add ("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
response.getHeaders().add ("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "origin, content-type, accept");
}
}

Finally, you will be able to communicate with the REST web service from the Angular application.

REST Services with Spring
As a strong alternative to JAX-RS, the Spring Framework also provides first-class support for quickly building a REST web service.

Simply put, Spring MVC offers a similar programming model, driven by the @RestController and @RequestMapping annotations, to expose the API to clients.

A good way to start bootstrapping a Spring application is making use of Spring Boot:

<parent>
<groupId>org.springframework.boot </groupId>
<artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent </artifactId>
<version>1.5.4.RELEASE</version>
</parent>
<dependencies>
<dependency>
<groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
<artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web </artifactId>
</dependency>
</dependencies>

After adding the necessary dependencies, you can create a @RestController annotated class with methods for each web service endpoint.

The example will be the same as the previous one - handing User resources - to better illustrate the differences and similarities between the two approaches:

@RestController
public class UserController {
private static List<User> users = new ArrayList<>();

@PostMapping(value = "/users", consumes = MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_VALUE)
@ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.CREATED)
public void addUser(@RequestBody User user) {
users.add(user);
}

@GetMapping("/users")
public List<User> getUsers() {
return users;
}
}

With Spring, you have similar handy annotations, corresponding to each HTTP method, such as @PostMapping and @GetMapping. You can define the endpoint URL using the value attribute, or specify the media type consumed or produced by the service by using the consumes or produces attributes.

Of course, the REST support in Spring goes far beyond these simple operations and provides a full programming model to build APIs. If you'd like to go deeper into what's possible, have a look at the reference documentation here.

Best Practices for REST Services
Now that you've seen two different ways that you can build REST services, it's important to also discuss some best practices that will allow you to create more useful, standardized and easy to use APIs.

One of the most important principles to follow when building your REST service is the HATEOAS constraint.

HATEOAS stands for "Hypermedia as the Engine of Application State" and states that a client should be able to interact with a web service, by only using the hypermedia information provided by the service itself.

The main purpose of HATEOAS is to decouple client and server functionality so that changes to the service do not break client functionality, and the service can evolve independently of clients.

Simply put, in addition to the standard responses, a service implementing HATEOAS will also include links to provide the client with a set of available operations they can perform with the API.

Both JAX-RS and Spring provide support for building HATEOAS services.

Spring REST HATEOAS Support
Let's see an example of adding HATEOAS links to the previously developed Spring REST service.

First, you need to add the spring-boot-starter-hateoas dependency:

<dependency>
<groupId>org.springframework.boot </groupId>
<artifactId>spring-boot-starter-hateoas </artifactId>
</dependency>

Next, you have to modify the resource class User so that it extends the ResourceSupport class:

public class User extends ResourceSupport { ... }

Then you can modify the REST controller to add a link. Spring HATEOAS contains the Link class and helpful methods to obtain the URIs:

@GetMapping("/users")
public List<User> getUsers() {
users.forEach(user -> {
Link selfLink =
linkTo(methodOn(UserController.class) .getUsers())
.slash(user.getEmail())
.withSelfRel();

user.add(selfLink);
});
return users;
}

This simple implementation adds a Link to each User resource - pointing the client to the canonical URI of the resource - /users/{email}.

Once you expose that URI, you of course also have to define a method to handle that endpoint mapping as well:

@GetMapping("/users/{email}")
public User getUser(@PathVariable String email) {
return users.stream()
.filter(user -> !user.getEmail()
.equals(email))
.findAny()
.orElse(null);
}

Calling the /users endpoint will now return an enriched Resource:

[
{
"email": "[email protected]",
"name": "ana",
"links": [
{
"rel": "self",
"href": "http://localhost:8080/users/[email protected]"
}
]
}
]

The standardization work in the REST ecosystem is making slow but steady progress; however, we're not yet at a point where documentation of the API isn't necessary.

Right now, documentation is actually very helpful and makes exploring and understanding the API a lot easier; that's why tools like Swagger and RAML have gained so much traction in recent years.

Documenting the API with Swagger
The documentation for your REST API can be created manually or with a documentation generation tool, such as Swagger.

Swagger is a specification that can be integrated with JAX-RS implementations, as well as with Spring REST implementations.

Let's set up Swagger in the simple Spring REST API we created, and have a look at the generated documentation.

First, you'll need the springfox-swagger2 dependency, as well as springfox-swagger-ui if you want a visual interface:

<dependency>
<groupId>io.springfox</groupId>
<artifactId>springfox-swagger2 </artifactId>
<version>2.7.0</version>
</dependency>
<dependency>
<groupId>io.springfox</groupId>
<artifactId>springfox-swagger-ui </artifactId>
<version>2.7.0</version>
</dependency>

In Spring Boot, the configuration only requires defining a Docket bean and adding the @EnableSwagger2 annotation:

@Configuration
@EnableSwagger2
public class SwaggerConfig {
@Bean
public Docket api() {
return new Docket(DocumentationType.SWAGGER_2)
.select()
.apis(RequestHandlerSelectors.basePackage ("com.stackify.controllers"))
.paths(PathSelectors.any())
.build();
}
}

This is all that is needed to support Swagger documentation generation for your Spring REST API in a Spring Boot application.

Then you can access the documentation at /swagger-ui.html:

Swagger API Documentation

Notice how the each endpoint in the application is individually documented; you can expand each section to find details about the endpoint and even interact with it right from the Swagger UI.

Conclusion
Web Services have become a very common and powerful way of architecting web applications, and the adoption trends are still going strong with the major focus on microservices in the last couple of years.

Naturally, there are several mature frameworks available to implement both REST and SOAP services in the Java ecosystem. And beyond the server side, there's solid support to test and document web services running over HTTP.

And, of course, the upcoming first-class Spring support for reactive architectures promises to keep this momentum strong and to address some of the limitations of the HTTP protocol, leading to even more performant APIs.

The post Java Web Services Tutorial: Improve App Communication And Flexibility appeared first on Stackify.

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(Oct. 31 - Nov. 2, 2017, Santa Clara Convention Center, CA)

@CloudExpo | @ThingsExpo 2018 New York 
(June 12-14, 2018, Javits Center, Manhattan)

Full Conference Registration Gold Pass and Exhibit Hall ▸ Here

Register For @CloudExpo ▸ Here via EventBrite

Register For @ThingsExpo ▸ Here via EventBrite

Register For @DevOpsSummit ▸ Here via EventBrite

Sponsorship Opportunities

Sponsors of Cloud Expo | @ThingsExpo will benefit from unmatched branding, profile building and lead generation opportunities through:

  • Featured on-site presentation and ongoing on-demand webcast exposure to a captive audience of industry decision-makers
  • Showcase exhibition during our new extended dedicated expo hours
  • Breakout Session Priority scheduling for Sponsors that have been guaranteed a 35 minute technical session
  • Online targeted advertising in SYS-CON's i-Technology Publications
  • Capitalize on our Comprehensive Marketing efforts leading up to the show with print mailings, e-newsletters and extensive online media coverage
  • Unprecedented Marketing Coverage: Editorial Coverage on ITweetup to over 100,000 plus followers, press releases sent on major wire services to over 500 industry analysts

For more information on sponsorship, exhibit, and keynote opportunities, contact Carmen Gonzalez (@GonzalezCarmen) today by email at events (at) sys-con.com, or by phone 201 802-3021.

Secrets of Sponsors and Exhibitors ▸ Here
Secrets of Cloud Expo Speakers ▸ Here

All major researchers estimate there will be tens of billions devices - computers, smartphones, tablets, and sensors - connected to the Internet by 2020. This number will continue to grow at a rapid pace for the next several decades.

With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing Cloud strategies, now is the perfect time to attend @CloudExpo@ThingsExpo, October 31 - November 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center, CA, and June 12-4, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, and learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enterprise is on the right path to Digital Transformation.

Delegates to Cloud Expo | @ThingsExpo will be able to attend 8 simultaneous, information-packed education tracks.

There are over 120 breakout sessions in all, with Keynotes, General Sessions, and Power Panels adding to three days of incredibly rich presentations and content.

Join Cloud Expo | @ThingsExpo conference chair Roger Strukhoff (@IoT2040), October 31 - November 2, 2017, Santa Clara Convention Center, CA, and June 12-14, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, for three days of intense Enterprise Cloud and 'Digital Transformation' discussion and focus, including Big Data's indispensable role in IoT, Smart Grids and (IIoT) Industrial Internet of Things, Wearables and Consumer IoT, as well as (new) Digital Transformation in Vertical Markets.

Financial Technology - or FinTech - Is Now Part of the @CloudExpo Program!

Accordingly, attendees at the upcoming 21st Cloud Expo | @ThingsExpo October 31 - November 2, 2017, Santa Clara Convention Center, CA, and June 12-14, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, will find fresh new content in a new track called FinTech, which will incorporate machine learning, artificial intelligence, deep learning, and blockchain into one track.

Financial enterprises in New York City, London, Singapore, and other world financial capitals are embracing a new generation of smart, automated FinTech that eliminates many cumbersome, slow, and expensive intermediate processes from their businesses.

FinTech brings efficiency as well as the ability to deliver new services and a much improved customer experience throughout the global financial services industry. FinTech is a natural fit with cloud computing, as new services are quickly developed, deployed, and scaled on public, private, and hybrid clouds.

More than US$20 billion in venture capital is being invested in FinTech this year. @CloudExpo is pleased to bring you the latest FinTech developments as an integral part of our program, starting at the 21st International Cloud Expo October 31 - November 2, 2017 in Silicon Valley, and June 12-14, 2018, in New York City.

@CloudExpo is accepting submissions for this new track, so please visit www.CloudComputingExpo.com for the latest information.

About SYS-CON Media & Events

SYS-CON Media (www.sys-con.com) has since 1994 been connecting technology companies and customers through a comprehensive content stream - featuring over forty focused subject areas, from Cloud Computing to Web Security - interwoven with market-leading full-scale conferences produced by SYS-CON Events. The company's internationally recognized brands include among others Cloud Expo® (@CloudExpo), Big Data Expo® (@BigDataExpo), DevOps Summit (@DevOpsSummit), @ThingsExpo® (@ThingsExpo), Containers Expo (@ContainersExpo) and Microservices Expo (@MicroservicesE).

Cloud Expo®, Big Data Expo® and @ThingsExpo® are registered trademarks of Cloud Expo, Inc., a SYS-CON Events company.

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@WebRTCSummit Stories
SYS-CON Events announced today that Telecom Reseller has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 22nd International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY. Telecom Reseller reports on Unified Communications, UCaaS, BPaaS for enterprise and SMBs. They report extensively on both customer premises based solutions such as IP-PBX as well as cloud based and hosted platforms.
WebRTC is great technology to build your own communication tools. It will be even more exciting experience it with advanced devices, such as a 360 Camera, 360 microphone, and a depth sensor camera. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Masashi Ganeko, a manager at INFOCOM Corporation, introduced two experimental projects from his team and what they learned from them. "Shotoku Tamago" uses the robot audition software HARK to track speakers in 360 video of a remote party. "Virtual Teleport" uses a multiple Intel RealSense Depth Camera to scan 3D and build 3D models in real-time, and display as hologram in front of remote participants.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Evatronix will exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Evatronix SA offers comprehensive solutions in the design and implementation of electronic systems, in CAD / CAM deployment, and also is a designer and manufacturer of advanced 3D scanners for professional applications.
SYS-CON Events announced today that CrowdReviews.com has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 22nd International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 5–7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. CrowdReviews.com is a transparent online platform for determining which products and services are the best based on the opinion of the crowd. The crowd consists of Internet users that have experienced products and services first-hand and have an interest in letting other potential buyers learn their thoughts on their experience.
It is of utmost importance for the future success of WebRTC to ensure that interoperability is operational between web browsers and any WebRTC-compliant client. To be guaranteed as operational and effective, interoperability must be tested extensively by establishing WebRTC data and media connections between different web browsers running on different devices and operating systems. In his session at WebRTC Summit at @ThingsExpo, Dr. Alex Gouaillard, CEO and Founder of CoSMo Software, presented a comprehensive view of the numerous testing challenges researchers have faced before arriving at the first release candidate of the WebRTC specifications.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Synametrics Technologies will exhibit at SYS-CON's 22nd International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY. Synametrics Technologies is a privately held company based in Plainsboro, New Jersey that has been providing solutions for the developer community since 1997. Based on the success of its initial product offerings such as WinSQL, Xeams, SynaMan and Syncrify, Synametrics continues to create and hone innovative products that help customers get more from their computer applications, databases and infrastructure. To date, over one million users around the world have chosen Synametrics solutions to help power their accelerated business and personal computing needs.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Google Cloud has been named “Keynote Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Companies come to Google Cloud to transform their businesses. Google Cloud’s comprehensive portfolio – from infrastructure to apps to devices – helps enterprises innovate faster, scale smarter, stay secure, and do more with data than ever before.
Recently, WebRTC has a lot of eyes from market. The use cases of WebRTC are expanding - video chat, online education, online health care etc. Not only for human-to-human communication, but also IoT use cases such as machine to human use cases can be seen recently. One of the typical use-case is remote camera monitoring. With WebRTC, people can have interoperability and flexibility for deploying monitoring service. However, the benefit of WebRTC for IoT is not only its convenience and interoperability. It has lots of potential to address current issues around IoT - security, connectivity and so on - based on P2P technology. It will become a key-component especially in edge computing use cases, in his view.
Cloud Expo | DXWorld Expo have announced the conference tracks for Cloud Expo 2018. Cloud Expo will be held June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, and November 6-8, 2018, at the Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA. Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with the introduction of DX Expo within the program. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throughout enterprises of all sizes.
The 22nd International Cloud Expo | 1st DXWorld Expo has announced that its Call for Papers is open. Cloud Expo | DXWorld Expo, to be held June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY, brings together Cloud Computing, Digital Transformation, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps, Machine Learning and WebRTC to one location. With cloud computing driving a higher percentage of enterprise IT budgets every year, it becomes increasingly important to plant your flag in this fast-expanding business opportunity. Submit your speaking proposal today!
22nd International Cloud Expo, taking place June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, and co-located with the 1st DXWorld Expo will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud strategy. Meanwhile, 94% of enterprises are using some form of XaaS – software, platform, and infrastructure as a service.
22nd International Cloud Expo, taking place June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, and co-located with the 1st DXWorld Expo will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud strategy. Meanwhile, 94% of enterprises are using some form of XaaS – software, platform, and infrastructure as a service.
DevOps at Cloud Expo – being held June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY – announces that its Call for Papers is open. Born out of proven success in agile development, cloud computing, and process automation, DevOps is a macro trend you cannot afford to miss. From showcase success stories from early adopters and web-scale businesses, DevOps is expanding to organizations of all sizes, including the world's largest enterprises – and delivering real results. Among the proven benefits, DevOps is correlated with 20% faster time-to-market, 22% improvement in quality, and 18% reduction in dev and ops costs, according to research firm Vanson-Bourne. It is changing the way IT works, how businesses interact with customers, and how organizations are buying, building, and delivering software.
@DevOpsSummit at Cloud Expo, taking place June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, is co-located with 22nd Cloud Expo | 1st DXWorld Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is no time to wait for long development cycles that produce software that is obsolete at launch. DevOps may be disruptive, but it is essential.
SYS-CON Events announced today that T-Mobile exhibited at SYS-CON's 20th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. As America's Un-carrier, T-Mobile US, Inc., is redefining the way consumers and businesses buy wireless services through leading product and service innovation. The Company's advanced nationwide 4G LTE network delivers outstanding wireless experiences to 67.4 million customers who are unwilling to compromise on quality and value. Based in Bellevue, Washington, T-Mobile US provides services through its subsidiaries and operates its flagship brands, T-Mobile and MetroPCS. For more information, visit https://www.t-mobile.com.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Cedexis will exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 - Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Cedexis is the leader in data-driven enterprise global traffic management. Whether optimizing traffic through datacenters, clouds, CDNs, or any combination, Cedexis solutions drive quality and cost-effectiveness. For more information, please visit https://www.cedexis.com.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Vivint to exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st Cloud Expo, which will take place on October 31 through November 2nd 2017 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, California. As a leading smart home technology provider, Vivint offers home security, energy management, home automation, local cloud storage, and high-speed Internet solutions to more than one million customers throughout the United States and Canada. The end result is a smart home solution that saves you time and money and ultimately simplifies your life.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Opsani will exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Opsani is the leading provider of deployment automation systems for running and scaling traditional enterprise applications on container infrastructure.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Nirmata will exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Nirmata provides a comprehensive platform, for deploying, operating, and optimizing containerized applications across clouds, powered by Kubernetes. Nirmata empowers enterprise DevOps teams by fully automating the complex operations and management of application containers and its underlying resources. Nirmata not only simplifies deployment and management of Kubernetes clusters but also facilitates delivery and operations of applications by continuously monitoring the application and infrastructure for changes, and auto-tuning the application based on pre-defined policies. Using Nirmata, enterprises can accelerate their journey towards becoming cloud-native.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Opsani to exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st Cloud Expo, which will take place on October 31 through November 2nd 2017 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, California. Opsani is creating the next generation of automated continuous deployment tools designed specifically for containers. How is continuous deployment different from continuous integration and continuous delivery? CI/CD tools provide build and test. Continuous Deployment is the means by which qualified changes in software code or architecture are automatically deployed to production as soon as they are ready. Adding continuous deployment to your toolchain is the final step to providing push button deployment for your developers.